Tuesday, January 17, 2006

translation

I have just learned that, when translated into Japanese, the name Chris means "galloping squirrel."

7 comments:

John B. said...

I will have to let my oldest know that...he runs track / CC after all.

Bartleby said...

I, too, have a son named Chris. How did you happen to find that out?

Anonymous said...

Guess what my mum's name is... :)

Steven

Jason266 said...

I'll be sure not to mention that to my dogs...they hate squirrels.

TheCompleteGeek said...

The usual translation would be to something like "kurisu" and would be written in Katakana, a phonetic script usually used with foriegn words and names. There would be no non phonetic meaning unless you were searching for one.

For example, there is a Kanji (a Chinese character used in Japanese along with Korean and, of course, Chinese) variously identified as JIS 366E or Nelson (Classic) 5200 with one potential reading of "ku" that means to run, gallop, etc. When combined with squirrel, pronounced "risu", you do indeed get "galloping squirrel".

To take this one step further, since all we're doing is matching sounds, you could also come with a less poetic concoction like "phrase sign of the hog vinegar". That's one example--there's a nearly infinite number of potential matches, so you could essentially choice your own linguistic adventure.

If you're interested in even more irritatingly minute detail, google Jim Breen's WWWJDIC server and find out more than you would ever really want to know.

Confidential to Jason266: If I say "squirrel" around my two beasts, they immediately run to their nearest window to look for what I'm talking about. It's hilarious.

torporific said...

I cannot help but laugh at the thought of a galloping squirrel.

harriet said...

Re: your comment on my entry, I don't think it's actually possible to be completely satisfied with a diss. But I'm sure feeling a lot better about it than I was before in that I'm no longer embarassed to show it to people!